Falling Skies: "Silent Kill" Preview

Wake up Maggie, I think I've got something to say to you …
  • Wake up Maggie, I think I've got something to say to you …
Although "Silent Kill" is focused on the rescue mission, the essence of the episode seems to be the filling in of back story for some minor characters. We learn more about Maggie (Sarah Carter), who assists the rescue op by providing an inexplicable amount of knowledge about a hospital layout that just happens to be ingrained in her memory. She not only develops a bond with Hal (Drew Roy) throughout, but also begins to connect with some other people in the 2nd Massachusetts as well.


As for Anne (Moon Bloodgood), she finally gets to step out of the good-natured-doctor box — but only a little — when we learn more about her tortured past. (Doesn't everyone have a tortured past after an alien invasion?) It’s nice to see a character that has seemed so cool and collected up to this point finally snap a little bit. Otherwise, they’re just boring (cough cough *Lourdes*). We also see a softer side of Weaver, who for most of the series has just given orders before standing around looking simultaneously intimidating and somber. That doesn’t change too much during "Silent Kill," but he gets all sensitive over a song, thinking about lost loved ones I assume.


Oh, I almost forgot to mention that there’s a pretty big shock about 10 minutes into the episode. While I can’t say what it is, it seems to be mostly a plot device to create a semi-sense of urgency. Regardless, none of the characters have a huge reaction to it and it doesn’t play a huge role in the course of the episode. So, while it has shock value, at this point it doesn’t seem like it’ll have any overarching effects.

  • Always the good-natured doctor … until this week.

Before previewing this Sunday’s episode of Falling Skies, I have to speculate some on last week's episode, "Grace," now that I can do so without spoiling anything for you. (That being said, I would turn back now if it's still sitting unwatched on your DVR.)

Everybody ready? Here we go …

Is it just me or did that Skitter seem really frightened when he used Rick as a mouthpiece at the end of the episode? (And yes, for inexplicable reasons, I will assume that the Skitter is male.) I know what you’re thinking, “Of course he was scared, he’s a prisoner of war.” And yet, it seemed to me that the Skitter was more afraid of what would happen to him if he returned to the alien horde without his child prisoner. Why would the alien rather the 2nd Massachusetts kill him than go back alone? It makes me wonder whether the Skitters and Mechs are really the brains behind the invasion at all, or if another alien race (or their own superiors) are using them in a similar way to how they are using the harnessed human children? That might be wild speculation, but it’s fun to think about.

This week’s episode, “Silent Kill,” builds upon what we learned last week, with Tom (Noah Wyle) — drum roll, please — finally executing the mission to get his son back. When Tom first presents his admittedly bold plan to rescue the kids to Weaver (Will Patton) he gets shot down, with Weaver insisting that they must find a more subtle (and thus safer) idea. Fortunately, Hal, Anne and Maggie are all instrumental not only in planning the mission, but in executing it as well. (Hal even comes up with a surprising move that makes the mission a success.) But things take a strange turn when we see the Skitters interacting with the harnessed kids in a way that is surprising, eerie and potentially dangerous to the operation.

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