Bolts tie series with Pens

The Lightning took the lead less than six minutes into the second period on a highlight reel goal. Dominic Moore had the puck behind the net and found Sean Bergenheim with the perfect no look behind the back pass. Bergenheim tapped the puck into a wide open net to give the Lightning a 2-1 lead.


In a scary moment for the Bolts later in the second, Pavel Kubina hauled down Pittsburgh's Chris Conner, giving him a penalty shot. Conner was unable to even get a shot off though, as the puck rolled harmlessly off his stick as he came in on the opportunity.


Into the third, the Lightning faced a bit of adversity when Jordan Staal found the back of the net to tie the game at two. For Staal, it was his first goal of the postseason. After the goal, the Penguins had a great deal of jump and nearly scored the go-ahead goal, but Roloson made three point blank saves. Shortly after that sequence, the Lightning's Steve Downie beat Fleury on a rebound to regain the one goal lead.


The Bolts got a two goal cushion less then five minutes later when defenseman Mattias Ohlund banked the puck off the boards and found Ryan Malone on the breakaway. Malone beat Fleury with a slap shot from the slot to make the score 4-2, a score that would hold up.


For the Lightning, getting to this point has been quite the journey; coming from behind is never easy, but as head coach Guy Boucher points out, the Bolts were on the chopping block twice in a row to get to this point.


"We just played two game sevens because of the position we are in," Boucher said. "The fifth game was a do or die for us and that sixth game was a do or die. The seventh game was a do or die, we just played two."


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Staying alive.

The music was once again blaring from the Lightning locker room after an exhilarating 4-2 victory over the Pittsburgh Penguins on Monday night in front of a full house at the St. Pete Times Forum, forcing what will be a deciding game seven in Pittsburgh on Wednesday night. The Lightning rebounded all the way back from being down 3-1 in the series to force the seventh game.

"We stayed with our game plan and did what we had to do to win a hockey game," Lightning goalie Dwayne Roloson said. "We stayed within our system and played the way we had to play."

The Lightning beat quite a few trends to get this point and beat the Penguins on Monday night.

First, with the Penguins scoring the first goal of the night on a Pascal Dupuis shot after some confusion behind the net, the Lightning stayed in the game; previously, the team that scored first was the team that ended up winning the game.

Second, the Lightning found a way to make sure Pittsburgh goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury did not rebound from a bad game five. The Bolts put a great deal of pressure on Fleury, won the battles in front of the net and got to rebounds. That has been a huge key in the series, with Fleury not able to control any of his rebounds.

The Lightning answered the Penguins first goal with a goal from Teddy Purcell, who beat a down-and-out Fleury to tie the game at one. For Purcell, it was his first goal of the postseason.

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