Michael Jackson: He wants it back


A collection of Michael Jackson's possessions from Neverland Ranch is safe from the auctioneer's gavel now that the pop singer and Julien's Auction House have reached a settlement to their dispute over whether 2,000 items were ever intended for sale.


Specific terms were not disclosed Tuesday. But, in short, Jackson keeps his things, while Julien's keeps its exhibition, which was open to the public and originally meant to promote next week's sale.


"There was so much interest from so many of Jackson's fans that instead of putting the items in the hands of private collectors, Dr. Tohme and Julien's Auction House have made arrangements that will allow the collection to be shared with and enjoyed by Jackson's fans for many years to come," read a joint statement from Jackson spokesman Dr. Tohme R. Tohme and auction organizer Darren Julien.


Jackson's production company, MJJ Productions, sued Julien in early March, seeking to halt the sale by arguing that Jackson hadn't authorized it. A judge blocked one effort by MJJ Productions to cancel it earlier this month, and another was scheduled to hear arguments Wednesday for an injunction.


"I believe both sides are pleased with the resolution," Julien said Tuesday by telephone.


Julien has said he spent $2 million organizing the sale, which another auctioneer estimated could have fetched $12 million after its April 22 start. The exhibition in Beverly Hills costs $20 to attend, and auction catalogues -- a $50 single volume and $200, five-volume boxed set -- were still selling, Julien said.


The statement also said MJJ Productions and Julien's Auction House would be making a "substantial" donation to MusiCares to benefit artists in need.


Julien said all of Jackson's possessions, which the auction house took directly from the Neverland Ranch property, would be returned to the pop singer. He would not say where they would be taken.

Never say Neverland: Michael Jackson has decided he doesn't want to auction off all his junk precious memorabilia after all. Or maybe he never wanted to get rid of it in the first place? In any case, a dispute between the erstwhile King of Pop and the auctioneers has saved those jewel-encrusted gloves, MTV Moonmen and Sgt. Pepper-esque jackets from the cruelty of the gavel. That's a relief, huh? AP's report after the jump.

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