Rays offense impresses on opening day, but will it last?

Home sweet home.

click to enlarge America's love affair with itself and baseball continues. - Colin O'Hara
Colin O'Hara
America's love affair with itself and baseball continues.

Home sweet home.

Tropicana Field was in the spotlight as only one of three Major League Baseball stadiums to hold Opening Day on Sunday this year, one day earlier than the rest of the baseballing world, which celebrated this high holy holiday on Monday.

The red, white and blue bunting was hung over the railings with care while ESPN nationally broadcasted the newly-laid turf that no longer looks like spilled beer over grandma’s basement rug, but looked more like a freshly-mowed field of grass ready kick off the season on national TV.

And what is more satisfying than creeping out of the long dark winter only to emerge in the fluorescent lights under the dome to watch the Rays? Watching the Rays smash the Yankees, sending those snowbird fans searching for the exit before the game even ended. 

Tampa Bay exerted its dominance over the Yankees with a 7-3 victory, which eroded the fan support of the Yankees, leaving some more elbow room for the home fans.

Slowly but surely, more fans wearing pinstripes (who could probably barely name the starting lineup of the average Yankee game) made way for the exit with hopes their starting pitching woes will be contained to Sunday’s blunder.

The Rays batted around Yankees’ starting pitcher Masahiro Tanaka with ease. Tanaka posted the worst Opening Day start in Yankees history after lasting a mere two and two-thirds innings while giving up seven runs on eight hits, including two home runs to Evan Longoria and Logan Morrison.

click to enlarge America's love affair with itself and baseball continues. - Colin O'Hara
Colin O'Hara
America's love affair with itself and baseball continues.

Rays’ almost-ace Chris Archer threw a gem Sunday, lasting seven innings, giving up two runs on seven hits.

The Rays aren’t exactly known for their offensive prowess, but mustered up 13 hits with only Steven Souza, Jr. ending the day without a hit.

So, what does this mean? It should give Tampa Bay residents confidence that maybe this year will be better than the last. But that won’t be hard to do. Just as long as the Rays don’t post another 94 losses this season, it will be considered an improvement.

It also means that maybe the dumping of Drew Smyly and Logan Forsythe might actually pay off. Maybe This will finally be the year we don’t regret drafting Tim Beckham over Buster Posey. Maybe I’ll take a foul ball to the head and money will fly out my nose. Who knows? It was one game; one game with 161 more to go. This is a positive start to a marathon of baseball.

The Rays look to do it again on Tuesday evening, but never count the Yanks out after a big loss. The Trop can enjoy anther healthy crowd. Hopefully it will be able to enjoy a few healthy crowds this season without the help of visiting fans.

About The Author

Colin O'Hara

Colin O'Hara, Intrepid Sports Reporter, writes about sports for Creative Loafing and is the only CL writer ever  banned from a certain Croatian stadium, which makes him sort of a bad-ass. Follow him as he Tweets smart-ass sports shit...
Scroll to read more Sports & Recreation articles

Newsletters

Join Creative Loafing Tampa Bay Newsletters

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.