Tampa Bay’s Peak Surf Park shares new renderings, findings from analysis of proposed Pinellas site

A rep for the company said there are multiple proposed locations in the Bay area.

Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park.
Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park. c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
An opening date is definitely a ways off, and there’s still no location to share, but Tampa Bay is inching closer to catching a wave at the region’s first surf park.

This morning, Peak Surf Park—which is scouting locations in both Hillsborough and Pinellas—shared new renderings of the project that promises to bring half-a-mile of beach, venues for concerts and events, bars, restaurants, retail and more.
A press release says the Peak model is built around sustainability, but did not detail how it will focus on “implementing resources and practices that will benefit Tampa Bay’s waterways and ecosystem.” The release also touted impressive numbers from a preliminary survey by a hospitality consultant (90% of respondents expressed high interest, a 10 year projection of more than $1.3 billion in business output, more), but did not include the full survey results.

Peak Surf Park's website says it will integrate sustainability from the beginning of the process and that depending on land and permitting approvals, the park could take 2-3 years to be built. It promises locally-sourced labor, goods and restaurants and a hope for a "net zero"

The economic impact findings come from an analysis of proposed Pinellas County locations, and a rep for Peak Surf Park told Creative Loafing Tampa Bay that there are multiple proposed locations in the Bay area.
Waves will be created by technology from Australia’s Surf Lakes.

“The company is revolutionary in its design with the ability to simulate consistent, ocean-quality waves for varying skill levels in a controlled setting and offer beginners and experts alike a unique surf experience,” the release added.

A video of the wave-making process kind of looks like the whole thing works in the same way your cousin Vinny puts a big floaty around his belly and then bounces up and down in the backyard blow up pool—but more sophisticated, scientific, and marketable, obviously.

Surf Lakes’ own completed and operational Yeppoon site is not yet open to the public, but the company says it has “signed five Exclusive Territory Agreements and three Licence Agreements with more on the way.” In the U.S. Surf Lakes says it received 183 inquiries, and signed licenses in San Diego, Los Angeles and Nevada. In addition to those locations Surf Peaks also has “territory sold” in Tennessee.

Earlier this year, Peak Surf Park mastermind Tony Miller told CL that surfers of all levels will be able to enjoy the 30-acre park, and compared it to a ski mountain where there are green, black and black runs. Miller added that entrance won’t break the bank and that surfing will happen at an hourly rate.

“We are also exploring memberships and will announce those opportunities as we get closer to the opening,” he added.

Peaksurfpark.com has more details along with the park’s Facebook and Instagram accounts. See the new renderings below.
click to enlarge Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park. - c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park.
click to enlarge Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park. - c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park.
click to enlarge Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park. - c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park.
click to enlarge Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park. - c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park.
click to enlarge Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park. - c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park.
click to enlarge Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park. - c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
c/o PRESS PR + Marketing
Tampa Bay's Peak Surf Park.

About The Author

Ray Roa

Read his 2016 intro letter and disclosures from 2022 and 2021. Ray Roa started freelancing for Creative Loafing Tampa in January 2011 and was hired as music editor in August 2016. He became Editor-In-Chief in August 2019. Past work can be seen at Suburban Apologist, Tampa Bay Times, Consequence of Sound and The...
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