When it comes to Kyler Murray being the next Bucs QB, never say never

Time for a social media conspiracy theory.

The Cardinals’ young QB Kyler Murray recently unfollowed the team’s Instagram page and deleted all pictures connected to Arizona. - PHOTO VIA K1/INSTAGRAM
Photo via k1/Instagram
The Cardinals’ young QB Kyler Murray recently unfollowed the team’s Instagram page and deleted all pictures connected to Arizona.
It’s a slow time of year for all Bucs-related news, with the buzz around Brady’s retirement finally starting to die down but the offseason not quite beginning.

So let’s get into some weird, conspiracy theory news, eh?

The Cardinals’ young QB Kyler Murray recently unfollowed the team’s Instagram page and deleted all pictures connected to Arizona. His most recent picture was of him at the Pro Bowl, and his only recent post was a reshare of on his story of a post by Bucs receiver Mike Evans.
The post featured a caption mentioning the Evans’ desire to “catch a pass from the Texas legend.” The receiver was referring to Murray, who played high school football in the Lone Star State; Evans, of course, is a legend in his own right at Texas A&M.

Now, this is all likely a coincidence, and seeing as Murray is still on his rookie deal with the Cards and an elite young QB, the chances of him suiting up for the Bucs are closer to mine than slim.

But that’s what we said about Brady. That’s what we said about Playoff Lenny.

That there wasn’t a chance in hell either was coming.They were both supposedly headed for a bigger market.
I mean, the Bucs have all of their picks and a team that is only a year removed from winning the Super Bowl. They have a solid front office and coaching staff that is built for long-term sustainability.

The problem is trading for Murray then building a winner around him with limited cap space with probably no first round (and maybe second round) picks for the next two years.

The general asking price for a supremely talented player such as Murray is at least two first round picks, and with Murray playing such a high-impact position and his youth, the price tag could be even higher.

I could see Arizona asking for, and getting, three first and second round picks from someone. Could that someone be the Bucs?

Maybe. With Murray under center for however long the Bucs can keep him around, Tampa Bay would be competitive most years, especially in arguably the weakest division in football, the NFC South.

I’m just not entirely sold on the Cardinals giving up so easily on a franchise QB as good and as dynamic as Murray while he’s on his rookie deal. With your QB making so little money, a team is able to build around him by signing free agents to lucrative deals that perhaps a team with a boatload of money committed to the QB spot couldn’t.

So if Murray is unhappy with head coach Kliff Kingsbury, or with the general direction of the team, it seems likely that Arizona would be willing to work with the young QB.

Never say never, though.

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