Beer and film pairing: Harry and the Hendersons and Great Divide's Espresso Oak Aged Yeti

Now, now having watched this film since I was very little, there were a few things that I may have embellished in my mind over the years. Though the one constant thing is that the Bigfoot or "Harry" costume is still better than a lot of recent CGI out there today -- very realistic (to what I imagine the real probably looks like).


The brew I decided to pair with this film could have been the obvious Bigfoot Barleywine by Sierra Nevada, but instead I chose the Espresso Oak Aged Yeti by Great Divide for a number of reasons. The Bohemian Imperial Coffee Stout not only is one of my favorite beer styles, but knowing the ending of the film, I didn't want anything to high in alcohol content or the waterworks may have started -- leaving me crying like a baby.


Another reason I chose this brew is because it is a true delight to drink, with its almost woodsy aromas of oak, molasses, cherries and vanilla. It pours a dark black espresso color with an almost milky brown head. The taste has a bitter coffee note at first, followed by sweeter, malty notes with hints of oak, vanilla and a warming finish. Just like the end of the film, when the family decides that Harry belongs in the wild in a heartfelt scene, John Lithgow hugging him good-bye as he wanders off, back into obscurity. It tugs at the viewers' heart strings.


Both the film and the brew impart  similar characteristics and make for an enjoyable and nostalgic movie experience.


Stay tuned for more movie and beer pairings coming up this month and remember to: Drink. Taste. Pair. Live.


Cheers,


Thomas Barris


The Wild Cicerone


Beer photo courtesy Michael Allen Smith via Flickr.

During the late '80s and early '90s, some of the most original children's/family films where made. Whether they were life-altering or just plain garbage, I leave up to you. Many ended up having a special place in our hearts, to the extent that people have gone out (sometimes to great lengths) to find these on DVD, downloaded them from some movie nostalgia site or have acquired the original VHS — or even Beta Max — in all its glory.

One of these films, Harry and the Hendersons, was directed by William Dear. Not only has he directed masterpieces such as Harry and the Hendersons, but he also help create classics such as, Angels in the Outfield and If Looks Could Kill with acting legend Richard Grieco. Today's pairing is Harry and the Hendersons and the Espresso Oak Aged Yeti by Great Divide Brewing Co. out of Denver, Colorado.

Harry and the Henderson is a heartwarming film about a typical family who, while on a family hunting trip and (as a normal family does) ends up hitting something with their station wagon. Of course, it ends up being none other the legendary Bigfoot, the Yeti himself. The father, played by John Lithgow, after seeing what he has hit, decides to tie it to his car and take it home with them. It being such a once-in-a-lifetime discovery, be believes there is a fortune to be made off the carcass alone. Once home, the beast awakens and hilarious catastrophe ensues. From their house being destroyed, the car bumper being thrown in the neighbor's pool and, of course, being eaten out of house and home.

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