Best of the day: Ella's Folk Art Cafe Bloody "Ella" Mary with rib garnish

click to enlarge SO MEATY: The Bloody Ella, a rib-garnished take on the Bloody Mary. - Arielle Stevenson
Arielle Stevenson
SO MEATY: The Bloody Ella, a rib-garnished take on the Bloody Mary.

click to enlarge SO MEATY: The Bloody Ella, a rib-garnished take on the Bloody Mary. - Arielle Stevenson
Arielle Stevenson
SO MEATY: The Bloody Ella, a rib-garnished take on the Bloody Mary.
  • Arielle Stevenson
  • SO MEATY: The Bloody Ella, a rib-garnished take on the Bloody Mary.

There's no telling what led you to Sunday's decision to sip on a Bloody Mary. But here you are. And you don't just want some vodka and tomato juice slapped together with a celery stick.

You want a Bloody Mary that gets up early, stays up late, with uninterrupted prosperity, who uses a machete to cut through red tape.

You want the Bloody Ella, the rib-garnished take on the Bloody Mary from Ella's Folk Art Cafe in Seminole Heights. That's right, the glass arrives with owner Ernie Locke's infamous hickory-smoked ribs. Made with chipotle vodka and rimmed with Locke's BBQ-rub, we have Bloody Ella inventor Scott Imrich to thank for this revelation in brunch cocktails.

It's only available on Sundays, as part of the Soul Food Sunday brunch (a formidable weekly culinary event one should experience as often as possible).

$10, 11 a.m.-8 p.m., 5119 N. Nebraska Ave., Tampa, 813-234-1000.

And since I liberally quoted Cake's Short Skirt Long Jacket, you can jam on this en route to your Bloody Ella.

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