Music Monday, Vol. 24: Grinderman, Roxy Music, Lost in the Trees, and more (with video)

Taylor Punch Brothers, Antifogmatic (2010)


The most incredible bluegrass I've ever heard.


Shawn Roxy Music, Roxy Music (1972)


Talk about an airhorn for the soul. This album is a more effective wake-up cure than two shots of strong espresso. There should be a warning not to listen to it during morning commutes over long portions of expressways. Now check out some awesome glam footage below. And remember: don't stare directly at Brian Eno; you might go blind.



[image-1] The Police, Message in a Box: The Complete Recordings of The Police (1993)


Much to the dismay of his mother, my 13-year-old son has developed an intense desire to become a professional drummer. Two years of drum lessons has brought him from the realm of loud and out of control to the level of loud and potentially talented. In an effort to influence his heavy metal taste with a little finesse, and possibly save our eardrums, I introduced him to Stewart Copeland. Not personally, but rather via Message in a Box, a complete four-disc box set of The Police that starts with the band's early punk-reggae sound and ends with the jazzy, pop-influenced era that saw the initial end of the band. Although I thought that it might just provide him something new to chew on, it also reminded me why I liked the band so much. Luckily, my son copied the set to his iPod and gave the CDs back to me. I'm really glad he did; besides, what's a 13 year old going to do with an actual CD anyway?


Deborah Lost in the Trees, All Alone in an Empty House (2010)


I caught the NPR Tiny Desk concert from Lost in the Trees a few months ago and was completely blown away by the elegance and intensity of their sound, especially Ari Picker's clear-as-a-bell vocals. I then ... completely forgot to buy the album. I finally just got last year's release, described by NPR as "orchestral folk where the 'orchestral' part isn't an afterthought." So far I'm only a couple of songs in and am finding it to be quirky, engrossing, and unique; definitely traits I enjoy from folk artists. They're scheduled to play the Orpheum next Monday, January 17, which is sounding like a don't-miss show to me. Check out the clip from NPR and decide for yourself.


[image-2] – Lemuria, Pebble (2011)


Lemuria is simply delightful. A few years ago, my friend Matt suggested I come and see them play at Transitions. (Thanks, Matt!) Since then, I've been hooked on Lemuria’s brand of indie pop with a punk twist and I am definitely not the only one. Lemuria is a Fest favorite, playing larger venues each year with at-capacity crowds singing along to every word. Officially released tomorrow (January 11, 2011), Pebble is Lemuria's second full-length and their first on Bridge 9 Records. Lemuria polishes their sound on Pebble with an emphasis on allowing both Alex and Sheena to showcase their voices individually rather than exclusively using the traditional call and response of dual vocalists. For those on the fence who need a reason to take a chance on this record? It was produced by indie rock favorite J. Robbins. My picks off the record along with a lyrical excerpt are as follows: (1) Durian – “If I crack you open* / Will I taste pineapple / Or will I smell durian” and (2) The One – “Why do you love me? / I’m a mosquito bite on your arm / itching until your bleeding scars.”  Lemuria is currently on tour promoting Pebble - unfortunately, most of their Florida stops were last week - but their last Florida date is tonight in Gainesville at the Atlantic. I'm sure they'll be back here soon.


What are you listening to right now? We want to know! Leave your answer below in the comments section...



Deborah - Lost in the Trees, All Alone in an Empty House - 2010


I caught the NPR TIny Desk concert from Lost in the Trees a few months ago and was completely blown away by the elegance and intensity of their sound, especially Ari Picker's clear-as-a-bell vocals. I then...completely forgot to buy the album. I finally just got last year's release, described by NPR as "orchestral folk where the 'orchestral' part isn't an afterthought." So far I'm only a couple of songs in and am finding it to be quirky, engrossing, and unique; definitely traits I enjoy from folk artists. They're scheduled to play the Orpheum on January 17th, which is sounding like a don't-miss show to me. Check out the clip from NPR and decide for yourself: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129980195


The 2011 return of Music Monday, where the Creative Loafing music team reveals what we're jamming to break through the Monday malaise and rocket launch the work week… Click here to check out previous entries.

Grinderman, Grinderman 2 (2010)

I feel pretty dumb for listening to this after I built my top 10 of 2010, because Grinderman 2 certainly deserved a spot. If you dug the sexy ruckus of the first album from Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds’ seedy underbelly, you’re in for more of the same. Cave seduces a housewife in “Kitchenette” and in the phallacious “Worm Tamer,” he brags, “My baby calls me the Loch Ness Monster / two great big humps and then I’m gone.” More like nine slices of raw, sometimes experimental rock that often explores Cave’s inner lech. As he warns on “Heathen Child,” your husband, your wife, your children, your government, your gods – they can’t protect you from Grinderman.

Gabe Scott Walker, Sings Jacques Brel (1981)

This compilation was released in the early 1980s but date back to the early 1970s as they were culled from Scott Walker's initial batch of daring solo recordings. After leaving the Walker Brothers, a three-piece outfit that elicited near Beatlemania hysteria in the UK in the mid-1960s, Walker stepped out on his own and branched off in a most unexpected route. He'd become fascinated with the style and wry humor in the songs of Belgian-born composer Jacques Brel and decided to cover a significant chunk of Brel's music, predating David Bowie's foray into Brel's catalog. Walker's dark torch-like delivery was no doubt the catalyst and inspiration for the vocal stylings of Nick Cave, Antony Hegarty, Marc Almond and Bowie himself. Highly recommended listening.

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