Today in rock history; thankful

Snoop Dogg, Public Image Ltd., AC/DC and more.

Today I’m thankful for so much…

My life and my identity both revolve around music; it’s the thing that’s continually inspired me and intrigued me for as long as I can remember.

Therefore, much of what I’m grateful for is a direct result of the music that’s served as a continual source of creativity and amazement for me for many years.

I’m grateful for all the friends I’ve made through music…people I’ve gotten to know through record stores, concerts and a mutual connection involving music.

I’m grateful for those who’ve worked tirelessly to make Tampa a great music town. We have great local bands, venues, record stores and events that are all possible thanks to the hard working people who make it happen each and every day.

I’m grateful for my incredible family who’ve always supported and encouraged my somewhat unnatural addiction to music.

I’m grateful for a partner who shares my passion for music and who is as convinced as I am that Paul Weller is the coolest guy on the planet.

I’m grateful for Creative Loafing and its willingness to help me express my opinions and my passion for music on a daily basis.

And, last but not least, I’m grateful for those who take the time to read my daily musings related to the music I love and treasure.

So I have a lot to be grateful for.

Be happy. Be healthy. Be grateful. And turn up the volume…

Today’s installment of our daily recap of historic, relevant musical events comes with a hearty dose of thankfulness; we are thankful for the music that fuels us, inspires us, captivates us, motivates us and keeps us entertained and engaged all year long. Music is the food that fuels our creativity and our imagination and our lives benefit and thrive thanks to the grooves on the vinyl that serve as the perpetual soundtrack to our lives and our livelihood. So, for that, we are thankful today. Where would we be without music? In a nod to the various types and styles of music that thrill and excite us, today’s Thanksgiving banquet of music is replete with a little bit of something for everyone: we have a hearty helping of post-punk brilliance courtesy of Public Image Ltd., some red hot, sizzling firepower supplied by AC/DC, a slab of tasty hip hop thanks to Snoop Dogg and a delicious, decadent sweet treat coming from the legendary Queen and its world famous, ornate, operatic anthem.

So, dig in, taste the music, let it feed your soul on this day of gratitude and thanks, and let it nourish you for days and years to come…


Today in rock history: on this date in 1993, rising hip hop megastar Snoop Doggy Dogg (now more commonly known as Snoop Dogg) released his debut album, Doggystyle. After being noticed for this distinctive contributions to Dr. Dre’s 1992 classic, The Chronic, Snoop stepped out on his own and struck gold with his very first solo release. The highly anticipated album produced several hit singles including “Gin and Juice,” “Doggy Dog World” and “Who Am I? (What’s My Name?)” which sampled “Atomic Dog,” the 1982 hit by godfather of funk, George Clinton. Doggystyle sold incredibly well; it debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s pop charts upon its release and sold almost 1 million copies after being out for only a week. This highly anticipated album was one of the biggest sellers of ’93 and has since been deemed one of the greatest hip-hop albums of all time. The record that helped introduce the hip hop subgenre known as “g-funk” has gone on to sell 10 million copies in the United States alone and helped establish Snoop (nee Calvin Broadus) as one of the top selling hip hop artists of all time.


Today in rock history: on this date in 1975, Queen started a staggering nine-week run at the No. 1 spot on British singles chart with its epic, "Bohemian Rhapsody." The single came from the band’s enormously successful fourth album, A Night At The Opera which was released a day before its lead single hit the top spot in England. Often considered the greatest British single of all time by various English publications, the song has never waned in popularity or appeal, continuing its enduring legacy as a song that music listeners of all ages from all around the world are familiar with. The promotional film that was created to accompany the song has often been regarded as being the very first rock video created to help promote the release of a rock and roll single. The filming of the clip only cost £5,000 (equivalent to a little over $6,000 U.S. dollars) to produce but its imagery and longevity have made it a classic bit of historical rock footage. Record company executives shuddered and warned against the release of a nearly six-minute song that included an operatic section within it fearing that it would be a huge disaster. Lead singer and the song’s writer Freddie Mercury insisted that the song be released as is without any edits and his perseverance paid off; the song is by far one of the most famous and well known rock and roll songs of all time and will continue to dazzle and amaze for generations to come.


Today in rock history: on this date in 1979, John Lydon’s post Sex Pistols band, Public Image Ltd., released its sophomore album titled Metal Box. The band’s 1978 debut album, First Issue was critically acclaimed and proved that Lydon (previously known as Johnny Rotten) was able to move on after the demise of the Pistols and continue to make vital, envelope-pushing music…but nothing prepared listeners and followers for Metal Box. Delving more into avant-garde music, experimental sounds and dub music, the band defied all preconceived notions and created, by far, the most ambitious work of its career. The original pressing of the 3-LP set came packaged in a film canister that was barely large enough to house the records. Many fans were disappointed in regard to the way the record was marketed and housed; the initial pressing would wind up being created as a limited edition and, the following year, the record would be repacked in a more conventional record sleeve and would be re-titled “Second Edition” as a 2-LP package. Two singles were released from the unorthodox album in England and charted respectably: “Death Disco” and “Memories.” The album is full of surprising and daring highlights, like the ten-minute opening opus, “Albatross” and has remained a favorite of Lydon’s most dedicated and loyal fans.


Today in rock history: on this date in 1981, Australian powerhouse hard rock band AC/DC released its eighth studio album, For Those About To Rock We Salute You. Having the unenviable task of serving as the follow-up to the band’s biggest and most successful album, the worldwide smash, Back In Black, the band came out with guns blazing for this razor sharp, hard-rocking classic. Hits from the record included “Let’s Get It Up” and the explosive, anthemic title track which ranks among the very best of the band’s lengthy repertoire. The album became the very first in the band’s catalog to reach the coveted No. 1 spot on the U.S. Billboard album charts (surprisingly, Back in Black managed to make it only as high as No. 4 on American sales charts in 1980, the year of its release and went on to sell over 4 million copies in the States alone although it was a huge hit all around the globe and it continued to bolster the band’s stature as the best-selling hard rock band of their era.


About The Author

Gabe Echazabal

I was born on a Sunday Morning.I soon received The Gift of loving music.Through music, I Found A Reason for living.It was when I discovered rock and roll that I Was Beginning To See The Light.Because through music, I'm Set Free.It's always helped me keep my Head Held High.When I started dancing to that fine, fine...
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