An Indonesian plant may lead to male birth control (video)

Indonesian researchers have been testing Gandarusa on mice since 1987 with few negative side effects. They have since moved to human trials. Of the 100 couples to take the drug, none conceived a child while on the pill and the men's sperm returned to normal in less than two months.


After additional testing, Gandarusa could hit shelves in Indonesia as early as next year. This is good news for Indonesia, which is the world's fourth largest country with 240 million people. However, even if American scientists take and interest in Gandarusa, it will take years of testing before the chemical achieves FDA approval, if at all. Still, even if Gandarusa proves only to be a partially effective birth control and a mild stress reliever, many men might use it in combination with condoms, the rhythm method, or a woman's word that she is on birth control.


Read more at PBS.org



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An Indonesian plant may lead to male birth control (video)

click to enlarge An Indonesian plant may lead to male birth control (video) - A Slim Fast Ad
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An Indonesian plant may lead to male birth control (video)

Gandarusa is a leafy plant that has been used by Indonesians for centuries to relieve stress. Recently researchers have also tried to harness its other side effect: reduced male fertility.

One of the main problems with oral contraceptives is that they alter a person's hormonal balance, causing such negative side effects as weight gain, reduced libido, and mood swings. However, the chemical found in Gandarusa does not interfere with a person's hormones. Rather, the chemical disarms sperm, making them unable to penetrate the egg.

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