Better Dead Than Red

DISCUSSION

click to enlarge A 2004 aerial shot showing concentrations of red tide on the west coast of Florida, especially off Estero Bay to the south of Tampa Bay. - The National Oceanographic And Atmospheric Administration
The National Oceanographic And
Atmospheric Administration
A 2004 aerial shot showing concentrations of red tide on the west coast of Florida, especially off Estero Bay to the south of Tampa Bay.

As anyone who's tried to fish or swim in late summer on the west coast of Florida knows, red tide and "dead zones" have become a nasty regular reality over the past decade. What's causing it? Is our pollution contributing to its frequency? And how can we blame the Bush administration? (OK, we made that last one up.) The Sierra Club is hosting "Turning the Tide," a community forum on red tide and coastal pollution designed to answer questions and clear up confusion about the issue. Featured speakers include scientists, government officials and environmental groups, with some notables being the St. Petersburg Times' outdoors writer, Terry Tomalin; Richard Eckenrod of the Tampa Bay Estuary Program; charter captain Wayne Genthner; and Frank Muller-Karger of USF's College of Marine Sciences. Sun., July 30, 1-4 p.m., Sirata Beach Resort, 5300 Gulf Blvd., St. Pete Beach, free, 727-824-8813.

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