Cries of passion: How to politely stifle your lover's ear-piercing screams

I am a 23-year-old lesbian with a beautiful girlfriend whom I met a month ago. Here's the problem: She screams so loudly throughout sex that I am concerned for my roommate and other people who live in our building, as well as the entire neighborhood. I would know how to handle this situation if she were completely mute during sex — draw her out, make it into a game, etc. — but I'm scared of telling her she's too loud, because I don't want to hamper her enjoyment. I even tried to make this into a role-play game where we would pretend we needed to be silent for some reason, but nothing makes a difference.

How can I approach this without making her self-conscious?

Lesbian Over Ungodly Din

You don't want to make her self-conscious, and that's a lovely impulse, but she's making you self-conscious, LOUD, and you're just going to have to risk making her self-conscious. Because we're not talking about a few loud yelps or screams at the climax(es) of the act(s), which is something a roommate or a neighbor can reasonably be expected to endure, but caterwauling throughout. That's not okay. Tell the new girlfriend that the yelling wouldn't be a problem if you lived on 200 acres of land, but you live in an apartment building, in the city, and you have a roommate and neighbors.

Under those circumstances, you have a right to ask her to stifle herself. And if she reacts badly, or if she sulks like a child, then she's obviously not mature enough to waste your valuable time (and tongue) on.

My husband has a cuckold fetish, which we have indulged through two drunken threesomes with two of his best friends. The first time, he really had to talk me into it. The second time, he steered me in that direction and I took the wheel. I now have had sex alone with Friend Two a few times. My husband was okay with it at first, but now he wants it to stop. I like the control he gave me, and now I don't want to be told no. He opened the door, and I don't want to close it. What do I do?

Not Ready To Stop

You close the damn door and you let your husband see that it's closed. You tell him that you'd rather the door were still open, NRTS, but you assure him that it's closed for now and will remain closed until he's ready to open it again.

That's pretty much the only way you can have your husband and, at some point down the road, "the control he gave you" too, i.e., his consent to fuck around with other men. Then you'll be able to open the door to a threesome again, this time without a booze assist. Although it might take him longer to get comfortable with the idea of you seeing other guys alone, which seems to have triggered the wrong kind of anxiety, i.e., anxiety of the non-boner-inducing variety, which is not what emotionally safe and sane cuckolding is all about.

Trust me, NRTS: Your husband is still into cuckolding. That's not a kink that evaporates after one or two drunken threesomes. He's probably just a little spooked by how quickly you progressed from having to be talked into it to having to be talked out of it. A time-out will give him a chance to see-and give you a chance to demonstrate-that he is still your first priority, emotionally and sexually.

Which he still is, right?

Poopnoodle. I heard this word for the first time today. When I asked what, exactly, a poopnoodle is, I was told that a poopnoodle is what happens when you pee right after fucking someone hard in the ass. Poop gets stuck up in the dick hole and comes out in the form of a noodle when you piss. I was wondering if this is something that actually happens, and if so, can you deem "poopnoodle" the official Savage Love term for this occurrence?

Couldn't Think Of An Acronym That Spelled Out "Poopnoodle"

If what you describe had ever actually happened to anyone, anywhere, ever, "poopnoodle" could be the official Savage Love term for it. But the poopnoodle never actually happens.

And think about it, CTOAATSOP: Buttfuckers fuck butt until they come. Wouldn't coming dislodge the poopnoodle?

Finally, some general advice for anyone out there who's interested in anal but now, thanks to CTOAATSOP here, fears the poopnoodle: Wear a condom. A condom can protect you from the poopnoodle and HIV.

I just read about a gay teenager in Indiana — Billy Lucas — who killed himself after being taunted by his classmates. Now his Facebook memorial page is being defaced by people posting homophobic comments. It's just heartbreaking and sickening. What the hell can we do?

Gay Bullying Victim Who Survived

Another gay teenager in another small town has killed himself — hope you're pleased with yourselves, Tony Perkins and all the other "Christians" out there who oppose anti-bullying programs (and give actual Christians a bad name).

Billy Lucas was just 15 when he hanged himself in a barn on his grandmother's property. He reportedly endured intense bullying at the hands of his classmates-classmates who called him a fag and told him to kill himself. His mother found his body.

Nine out of 10 gay teenagers experience bullying and harassment at school, and gay teens are four times likelier to attempt suicide. Many LGBT kids who do kill themselves live in rural areas, exurbs, and suburban areas, places with no gay organizations or services for queer kids.

"My heart breaks for the pain and torment you went through, Billy Lucas," a reader wrote after I posted about Billy Lucas to my blog. "I wish I could have told you that things get better."

I had the same reaction: I wish I could have talked to this kid for five minutes. I wish I could have told Billy that it gets better. I wish I could have told him that, however bad things were, however isolated and alone he was, it gets better.

But gay adults aren't allowed to talk to these kids. Schools and churches don't bring us in to talk to teenagers who are being bullied. Many of these kids have homophobic parents who believe that they can prevent their gay children from growing up to be gay-or from ever coming out-by depriving them of information, resources, and positive role models.

Why are we waiting for permission to talk to these kids? We have the ability to talk directly to them right now. We don't have to wait for permission to let them know that it gets better. We can reach these kids.

So here's what you can do, GBVWS: Make a video. Tell them it gets better.

I've launched a channel on YouTube-www.youtube.com/itgetsbetterproject-to host these videos. My normally camera-shy husband and I already posted one. We both went to Christian schools and we were both bullied-he had it a lot worse than I did-and we are living proof that it gets better. We don't dwell too much on the past. Instead, we talk mostly about all the meaningful things in our lives now-our families, our friends (gay and straight), the places we've gone and things we've experienced-that we would've missed out on if we'd killed ourselves then.

"You gotta give 'em hope," Harvey Milk said.

Today we have the power to give these kids hope. We have the tools to reach out to them and tell our stories and let them know that it does get better. Online support groups are great, GLSEN does amazing work, the Trevor Project is invaluable. But many LGBT youth can't picture what their lives might be like as openly gay adults. They can't imagine a future for themselves. So let's show them what our lives are like, let's show them what the future may hold in store for them.

The video my husband and I made is up now-all by itself. I'd like to add submissions from other gay and lesbian adults-singles and couples, with kids or without, established in careers or just starting out, urban and rural, of all races and religious backgrounds. (Go to www.youtube.com/itgetsbetterproject to find instructions for submitting your video.) If you're gay or lesbian or bi or trans and you've ever read about a kid like Billy Lucas and thought, "Fuck, I wish I could've told him that it gets better," this is your chance. We can't help Billy, but there are lots of other Billys out there-other despairing LGBT kids who are being bullied and harassed, kids who don't think they have a future-and we can help them.

They need to know that it gets better. Submit a video. Give them hope.

Scroll to read more Tampa Bay News articles
Join the Creative Loafing Tampa Bay Press Club

Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state.
Help us keep this coverage going with a one-time donation or an ongoing membership pledge.

Newsletters

Join Creative Loafing Tampa Bay Newsletters

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Creative Loafing Tampa Bay. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Creative Loafing Tampa Bay, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at [email protected]