Porn performer tests positive for HIV in Florida

The adult film industry voluntarily requires actors to have proof of a clean STD test within 30 days prior to shooting a scene. Unfortunately the performer in question tested positive at a Florida facility that does not have the same protocols or procedures in place as the California clinics that cater to adult performers.


Last month The Free Speech Coalition launched a new testing database, the Adult Performer Health and Safety Services, which will include numerous testing centers. However, the site will not be fully functional for another month.


Previously AIM Medical Associates managed STD screenings and the database of test results. However, AIM closed in May while battling a costly legal battle over the allegation that the clinic revealed performers' private medical information. The new database will reportedly identify which performers are cleared to work, but it will not provide their specific test results.


The AIM closure came in the wake of the last outbreak of HIV in the porn community. In October of 2010, Derrick Burts tested HIV positive at an AIM facility. Since then Burts has joined the AIDS Healthcare Foundation and their push to get the city to require condoms in LA based productions.


Right after the last HIV incident, many studios and performers called for mandatory condom use. However, this movement faded after the particulars of Burts' incident emerged. Burts was a cross-over actor, performing in both gay and straight sex scenes. The gay porn industry uses condoms, but the actors are not tested for STDs. Burts believes he contracted the disease during an unprotected oral sex scene with a man in Florida who was a "known positive." However, clinic officials released a statement claiming Burts acquired the virus through "private, personal activity." Burts believes this is a lie as he says the only person he had sex with outside of the industry was his girlfriend, and she tested negative. Others have said that Burt also offered his services as a male escort.


Mandatory condom use has received strong resistance from California based adult film studios who fear an LA mandate will simply shift porn production to another city, state, or country. Others fear that the condom requirement will go beyond vaginal or anal penetration, which carry the highest transmission rates, and will go so far as to require dental dams during girl-on-girl sex scenes, which have the lowest transmission rates.


If the adult community continues to insist that it is safe with testing alone, eventually excessive legal mandates will be imposed, which may effectively shutdown the porn industry in LA or even the US. Just as the industry realized that it needed to start monitoring for STDs before the law required excessive regulations, porn producers must take the initiative and require condom use at least during vaginal and anal sex if they want to survive.


Read more at the LATimes.com
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  • Protection can be sexy

The adult film industry has come to a halt after the news broke Monday that an unidentified porn actor tested positive for HIV at a Florida facility.

A moratorium on filming in Florida and California has been requested by the porn industry trade group, the Free Speech Coalition. The self-imposed shutdown is expected to last until a complete list of actors who have recently worked with the performer, and who have worked with the performer's co-stars, can be notified and tested.

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