Pick a new job for Rick Scott

He's doing a "workday" in a Tampa donut shop. What other jobs should he try?

Many pundits have speculated that this new Scott charm offensive, which also included inviting approximately three dozen reporters who regularly cover the Capitol to join him for coffee and doughnuts, is the influence of new chief of staff Stephen MacNamara, who recently replaced Mike Prendergast.


Not only is he now noshing with journalists, but his deputy communications director Amy Graham confirmed Monday that he will soon begin meeting with newspaper editorial boards, an act that he essentially said was meaningless in his campaign against Democrat Alex Sink last fall.


Bob Graham, who has been critical of some of Scott's actions this year, praised the governor for essentially taking a page out of his playbook, in a press release issued by the Scott camp:


"I commend Governor Scott on his commitment to understanding the hopes and concerns of Floridians by working with them. I found the workdays to give me an unusual insight not only into how people earn their living, but how they live their lives, pursue their dreams and confront their challenges. I hope that Governor Scott will have the same rich experiences as he commences workdays. I would also encourage other public officials to adopt this means of better understanding the citizens they represent,” stated Governor Graham."


Let's be honest here: Whether it's due to the influence of MacNamara or whoever, something had to change in terms of style for the governor. To call this first year "rocky" would be the understatement of the summer, and perhaps some of the things he has said and done have permanently alienated him from independent voters who will decide his future.


And what about Democrats? That train left the station the day he killed high-speed rail, if you'll pardon the mangled metaphor. His election has revived the moribund Florida Democratic party, and has given hope to national Democrats that his lack of popularity will help Barack Obama in the Sunshine State next year in his re-election bid.


But it's simple Human Relations 101. The ones who handle the press well get commensurate treatment, and that includes Jeb Bush and (especially) Charlie Crist. Yes, Scott's a rookie at the political game, but that's his own fault for not hiring more astute staffers who might have helped him avoid some of his unintentional errors.


Okay, enough of the lecture.


If you have a suggestion for the Governor’s workdays, send an email to [email protected]

  • Bob Graham started his work days back in 1977

Florida Governor Rick Scott announced on Monday that he will revive the tradition of former Governor and Senator Bob Graham and take "work days" at various businesses, beginning with a Tampa donut shop on Wednesday, Aug. 3. He'll be serving up the donuts from 6-8:30 a.m. at Nicola's Donuts and Bakery, 14390 N. Dale Mabry, in Tampa's Carrollwood neighborhood.

Although Graham began such activities while running for governor back in 1977, the idea resurfaced last week when aspiring GOP U.S. Senate candidate Craig Miller announced he would do two such events a month, as a way to generate publicity for his uphill race.

The governor says he'll try to do such stints once a month, and will do them specifically at occupations that he has held in his life prior to where he is now, in the governor's mansion.

“Like most Floridians, I have worked hard all my life. I started school in public housing and my family struggled financially,” said Governor Rick Scott. “For that reason I went to work at a young age doing everything from delivering newspapers and cleaning phone booths, to selling groceries and working on a ship in the Navy.”

Scroll to read more News Feature articles
Join the Creative Loafing Tampa Bay Press Club

Local journalism is information. Information is power. And we believe everyone deserves access to accurate independent coverage of their community and state.
Help us keep this coverage going with a one-time donation or an ongoing membership pledge.

Newsletters

Join Creative Loafing Tampa Bay Newsletters

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Creative Loafing Tampa Bay. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Creative Loafing Tampa Bay, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at [email protected]