Sh*t Happened 9/1/17: Snooty's death "preventable," arguing over sick kids, yay long weekend

click to enlarge Sh*t Happened 9/1/17: Snooty's death "preventable," arguing over sick kids, yay long weekend
Creative Commons/Michaelstone48

We've mindlessly scrolled, doggo-giffed and daydreamed our way through another week.

Our reward?

Labor Day Weekend, summer's unofficial sendoff...in places where summer actually ends, that is.

For us here in the Tampa Bay area, it'll be another six or seven weeks until you can stop worrying about whether you forgot to bring a sweater/scarf/Snuggie with you to the office/store/virtually everywhere that's indoors and obscenely over-air-conditioned in this state.

Here's what we missed during Thursday's doggo gifs.

An independent review concluded that Snooty, the beloved manatee who had died just after caretakers and fans celebrated his 69th birthday, died due in part to lack of communication and training among staff on things like, oh, I dunno, when to tighten loose screws on panels leading to hazardous underwater environs.

And speaking of loose screws, members of the Hillsborough County-based Save Southern Heritage — FL (the group that doxxed all those people a while back)  filed suit against local Democrats that accuses them of defamation after they made public comments condemning the group and its members as white supremacists, etc. There are other things one can call someone who's nostalgic for a time when white people were allowed to own other humans, guys.

In another example of the great political divide that may end us, Florida Department of Health officials got political after U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor, both Democrats, called on the state to reinstate all the Medicaid coverage it pulled from sick kids, not just some. The state's reaction? Basically that it's fake news. If they get anymore Trumpian, they'll offer "alternative wheelchairs" to kids in need (read: off-brand Radio Flyers).

And finally, something almost everyone can agree on: some 20,000 people weighed in on the possible delisting of the Florida panther. They're undergoing a review that's routine, but just in case, a diverse swath of the population urged federal officials to keep the struggling cats protected — lest some sociopath use his or her executive authority to reverse those protections just for kicks.


Scroll to read more Tampa Bay News articles

Newsletters

Join Creative Loafing Tampa Bay Newsletters

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.