South Florida monkey stolen from Palm Beach Zoo

There's a reward for her safe return.

click to enlarge This isn't an actual photo of the 12-year-old Goeldi's monkey stolen from the Palm Beach Zoo, but tell you what: You see any 8-inch monkey that looks even close to this, can you call CrimeStoppers? - West Palm Beach Police Department, via Twitter
West Palm Beach Police Department, via Twitter
This isn't an actual photo of the 12-year-old Goeldi's monkey stolen from the Palm Beach Zoo, but tell you what: You see any 8-inch monkey that looks even close to this, can you call CrimeStoppers?

From the "Why the hell do you want a monkey?" department: Some asshole stole a 12-year-old Goeldi's monkey from the Palm Beach Zoo and Conservation Society early Monday morning.

While the monkey — a female named Kali who weighs about a pound (Goeldi's monkeys are typically about 8-9 inches tall, excluding their tail) — looks adorable, she's a wild animal and probs not interested in being someone's pet. Additionally, the Smithsonian National Zoo lists Goeldi's monkey's as "vulnerable" — which means they're almost endangered. Goeldi's, native to South American rain forests, are social creatures who sleep and rest together.

WPBPD says Kali needs her meds.

What are the chances Kali will find her way back to the zoo and the other four Goeldi's monkeys? We can't say — we're not actuaries — but consider this:

"Goeldi’s monkeys are very popular on the illegal pet trade, and so since she is a female as far as breeding is concerned, she’s holding a pretty high value, upwards of $10,000 I’ve been told,” Naki Carter, the zoo's director and marketing and communication, said.

So, uh, we're guessing whoever swiped her — in the middle of the night and no one at the zoo's saying how that's even possible — didn't want a cute pocket pet.


Goeldi's monkeys are in the same family as marmosets, have shaggy black hair and, again, have no interest in being a damn pet, so if you have any information about the idiot who thought this was a great idea, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-458-TIPS. Yes, there's a reward.

About The Author

Cathy Salustri

Cathy's portfolio includes pieces for Visit Florida, USA Today and regional and local press. In 2016, UPF published Backroads of Paradise, her travel narrative about retracing the WPA-era Florida driving tours that was featured in The New York Times. Cathy speaks about Florida history for the Osher Lifelong Learning...
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