Study: men don't mind condoms as much as women think

men really aren't as big of douche bags as women think; college guys are much more willing to use condoms than women give them credit for.


Australian researchers surveyed over 1,000 college students with two questions: how willing are you to use condoms and how willing do you think your lover is? Respondents were divided into those in monogamous relationships and those in casual situations. In both groups, both sexes were more willing to use condoms than they thought their partners were. Especially women in casual sex relationships vastly underestimated their partner's willingness to use condoms.


Of course the study does have a major flaw; it only surveyed college educated people who grew up under the threat of AIDS. For this group condoms and sex go together like sun tan lotion and the beach. However, hippies who grew up in a time of birth control and group sex may detest condoms as ruining the spiritual connection of boneing a wrinkly old woman named Storm in their van. They may also use the line that latex isn't green because it doesn't degrade easily even though unplanned pregnancies leave a much larger carbon footprint than a sheath of latex. Also, guys who drop out of high school before they take health class may also be more offended by your insistence on using a condom.  These are the same guys who are likely to have children before they can legally drink and who will get tattoos of their various kids' hand prints before they take a paternity test.


Read more at psychologytoday.com



Almos30 years ago, the AIDS epidemic made condoms a necessary part of sex in anything other than monogamous relationships. But traditional antipathy toward condoms never disappeared, and many people who want to use them don't follow through, often because they fear their partner might be put off by condoms. However, a new study shows that men are more open to condoms than many women believe.


Australian researchers asked two questions of 1,144 college students, age 18 to 25: How willing are you to use condoms? And how willing do you think your lover is?


Respondents were separated into two groups, those in monogamous relationships, and those who engaged in casual sex. Overall, in both groups, both men and women were more willing to use condoms than they thought their lovers were. The biggest difference occurred among women engaged in casual sex. They substantially under-estimated men's willingness to use condoms.


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Women, no man will refuse to have sex with you just because you insist he wear a condom. He may bitch and moan and say that he just got out of a monogamous relationship or was just tested or that he lathers his junk each morning in a voodoo potion made from eunuch tears, but ultimately his desire to have sex will override any of his petty objections. If he still refuses, you probably don't want to even share the same breathing space as his dick; it has probably been exposed to so many STIs that it has developed a new airborne form of AIDS.

True, sex without a condom isn't as sensitive, but condoms do have their advantages. They make the guy last longer, they prevent pesky pregnancies and STIs (as well as the fear of these), and they make clean up easier. Now, a new study published in psychologytoday.com proves that

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