Study: Performing acts of kindness for a partner makes you like them more (video)

"The Benjamin Franklin Effect" explains why we grow to like people for whom we do nice things.

Share on Nextdoor
click to enlarge Study: Performing acts of kindness for a partner makes you like them more (video) - Holiday Inn Express
Holiday Inn Express
Study: Performing acts of kindness for a partner makes you like them more (video)


"The Benjamin Franklin Effect" theorizes that we become more fond of people for whom we do nice things. Psychologists believe this happens for a number of reasons. Person-specific altruism makes you more invested in the object of your affection. Also, performing nice acts makes you justify these acts by convincing you that the receiver deserves your time and investment.

Soul Pancake recently demonstrated this effect in a short experiment involving a handful of couples. One partner performed several nice tasks for the other, while the receiving partner did nothing. At the end of the experiment, the altruistic partner described themselves as five percent more attracted to their partner than at the beginning of the study, while the receiving partner's reported love for the nice partner was unchanged. One can only imagine how this dynamic would evolve over months or years of nice gestures.

Watch a video of the experiment below.


Scroll to read more Tampa Bay News articles

Newsletters

Join Creative Loafing Tampa Bay Newsletters

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.