John Lennon and Harry Nilsson were ejected from the Troubadour on this day in 1974

You apparently can get very drunk on Brandy Alexanders.

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Today in rock history: On this date in 1971, the Allman Brothers played the first of two nights at New York City’s Bill Graham-owned Fillmore East, where both performances were captured for the band’s third album — the now legendary At Fillmore East. The platinum-selling double-LP set the Florida band on a path to worldwide fame thanks to smoking-hot renditions of “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed,” “Hot ‘Lanta” and an extended version of one of the Allman Brothers’ most beloved songs, “Whipping Post."

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Today in rock history: On this date in 1974, John Lennon and Harry Nilsson were ejected from the Troubadour in Los Angeles. The pair was reportedly on a Brandy Alexander bender and started to heckle comedic siblings The Smothers Brothers, who were headlining the show. Nilsson and Lennon got into it with club employees, and Lennon even lost his glasses. It was the second time in a month that Lennon had to be ejected from the Troubadour (he also made a scene at a show by soul singer Ann Peebles).

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Today in rock history: On this date in 1955, trailblazing, respected and revered bebop saxophonist Charlie Parker died at the age of 34. Nicknamed “Yardbird” or “Bird” for short, Parker was influenced by jazz legend Count Basie and started to play the sax when he was just 10 years old. After leaving home in Kansas City, Missouri, Parker became well known throughout New York City where he gained a reputation as a mighty and talented musician. It’s also where he developed a heroin addiction that eventually gave way to several illnesses including bleeding ulcers and cirrhosis. In his final days, Parker suffered a heart attack and had a bout of pneumonia that eventually became the cause of his death.

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Today in rock history: On this date in 1917, Leonard Chess — founder of blues, rock and R&B label Chess Records — was born in Motal, Poland. Born Lejzor Shmuel Czyż, Leonard, his mother, brother and sister immigrated to Chicago in 1928 where they joined their father who was already working in the liquor business. Chess — who was inducted into the rock hall in 1987 — and his brother were active in the city’s jazz scene, and they started the label in the early 1950s by having artists like Muddy Waters and Jimmy Rogers on early rosters. Chess Records became one of the integral American imprints and was once home to Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Willie Dixon, The Moonglows and a host of other essential American artists.

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