Final vote on historic Stovall House expected from Tampa City Council

The property offers one of the oldest examples of Classical Revival architecture.

click to enlarge The Stovall House was originally built in 1909 by Florida Brewing Company manager L.T. Trousdale. - Ebyabe [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY 2.5  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], from Wikimedia Commons
Ebyabe [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY 2.5 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], from Wikimedia Commons
The Stovall House was originally built in 1909 by Florida Brewing Company manager L.T. Trousdale.

UPDATE 4:18 p.m.Rezoning approved.

Tampa City Council is expected to make the final call on whether or not to rezone the historic Stovall House for commercial activity on Thursday, Sept. 20. Owner and developer Blake Casper has received initial approval from city leaders to convert the South Tampa property at 4621 Bayshore Blvd. into a private social club, where “shared meals, thoughtful experiences, reflective moments and conversations with friends” will intertwine throughout the well-designed grounds.

Plans for the social club include a health and wellness facility, cultural center and five-unit B&B, according to the Tampa Bay Business Journal.

Yet not everyone is down with the idea. As WFLA reports, many members of the community are worried that this proposal from Casper, who’s also one of the minds behind the popular Oxford Exchange on Kennedy Boulevard, could disrupt the quiet residential neighborhood.

The Stovall House was originally built in 1909 by Florida Brewing Company manager L.T. Trousdale. Ownership of the iconic estate has changed hands over the years, but its second owner was Tampa Tribune publisher Wallace Stovall.

The property offers one of the area’s oldest examples of Classical Revival architecture.