Jefferson Airplane’s Marty Balin was born on this day in 1942

The former Tampa Bay resident died in 2018.

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Today in rock history: On this date in 1942, Jefferson Airplane co-founder (and eventual Tampa Bay resident) Marty Balin was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. Balin and Jefferson Airplane vocalist Grace Slick helped separate the sound and feel of the band from the work of many of its contemporaries. Appearing on the band’s landmark album, 1967’s Surrealistic Pillow, Balin was also present with the group for its performances at the legendary Woodstock festival in 1969 as well as its 1967 set at the groundbreaking Monterey Pop Festival.

Rejoining a revamped and renamed version of the group in the mid-’70s (Jefferson Starship), Balin appeared on Starship hits like “Miracles” and “Count on Me” before leaving that group late in the decade. Balin — who died last September at the age of 76 — also scored a 1981 solo hit, “Hearts.” The rock and roll hall of famer spent his later years as a Tampa Bay resident and became recognized for his artwork and paintings.

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Today in rock history: On this date in 1969, in a totally unplanned move, the Beatles surprised local neighbors, pedestrians and everyone else within earshot by performing on the roof of its Apple Corps headquarters for 42 minutes. Joined by keyboardist and songwriter Billy Preston, the Fab Four ran through multiple takes of songs like “Get Back,” “Don’t Let Me Down” and a handful of others. After the noise and the distraction of the event led to near pandemonium, local police asked the band to shut down the mini-concert. Sadly, this was the last time The Beatles would perform live together.

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Today in rock history: On this date in 1982, influential blues legend Lightnin’ Hopkins died at the age of 69 after his battle with cancer. Hopkins — born Samuel John Hopkins in Centerville, Texas — was inspired by Blind Lemon Jefferson and Robert Johnson, and he played a large role in inspiring artists like Jimi Hendrix, The Grateful Dead and Townes Van Zandt (among many others). He is best known for genre staples like “Leavin’ Blues” and “T-Model Blues."

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Today in rock history: On this date in 1979, Barbra Streisand and Donna Summer teamed up to release a wildly popular duet, “No More Tears (Enough is Enough),” which became one of the most enduring and best-selling songs of the disco era. The cultural milestone from two pop music giants led the nearly 12-minute, extended mix of the song to become the very first single of its kind to reach gold sales status.