Study: Few well-being advantages to marriage over cohabitation

click to enlarge Adult performer Lisa Ann - The Film: Just Married
The Film: Just Married
Adult performer Lisa Ann

click to enlarge Adult performer Lisa Ann - The Film: Just Married
The Film: Just Married
Adult performer Lisa Ann
  • The Film: Just Married

A new study, published in the Journal of Marriage and Family reveals that married couples experience few advantages for psychological well-being, health, or social ties compared to unmarried couples who live together. While both marriage and cohabitation provide benefits over being single, these reduce over time following a honeymoon period.

“Marriage has long been an important social institution, but in recent decades western societies have experienced increases in cohabitation, before or instead of marriage, and increases in children born outside of marriage,” said Dr Kelly Musick, Associate Professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University's College of Human Ecology. “These changes have blurred the boundaries of marriage, leading to questions about what difference marriage makes in comparison to alternatives.”