Mercury and other toxins in tattoo inks

Some inks contain many heavy metals, including lead and arsenic, the ingredients have been linked to cancer and birth defects.

click to enlarge As a result of a 2007 lawsuit brought by the American Environmental Safety Institute, two leading tattoo ink makers must now place warnings on their product containers, catalogs and websites to say that the “inks contain many heavy metals, including lead, arsenic and others” and that the ingredients have been linked to cancer and birth defects. - Hemera Collection, Thinkstock
Hemera Collection, Thinkstock
As a result of a 2007 lawsuit brought by the American Environmental Safety Institute, two leading tattoo ink makers must now place warnings on their product containers, catalogs and websites to say that the “inks contain many heavy metals, including lead, arsenic and others” and that the ingredients have been linked to cancer and birth defects.

click to enlarge As a result of a 2007 lawsuit brought by the American Environmental Safety Institute, two leading tattoo ink makers must now place warnings on their product containers, catalogs and websites to say that the “inks contain many heavy metals, including lead, arsenic and others” and that the ingredients have been linked to cancer and birth defects. - Hemera Collection, Thinkstock
Hemera Collection, Thinkstock
As a result of a 2007 lawsuit brought by the American Environmental Safety Institute, two leading tattoo ink makers must now place warnings on their product containers, catalogs and websites to say that the “inks contain many heavy metals, including lead, arsenic and others” and that the ingredients have been linked to cancer and birth defects.
  • Hemera Collection, Thinkstock
  • As a result of a 2007 lawsuit brought by the American Environmental Safety Institute, two leading tattoo ink makers must now place warnings on their product containers, catalogs and websites to say that the “inks contain many heavy metals, including lead, arsenic and others” and that the ingredients have been linked to cancer and birth defects.

E — The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: I’m interested in getting a new tattoo, but recently found out that red tattoo ink contains mercury. Is this true of other tattoo inks as well? Are there any eco-friendly alternatives? —John P., Racine, WA

It is true that some red inks used for permanent tattoos contain mercury, while other reds may contain different heavy metals like cadmium or iron oxide. These metals—which give the tattoo its “permanence” in skin—have been known to cause allergic reactions, eczema and scarring and can also cause sensitivity to mercury from other sources like dental fillings or consuming some fish. While red causes the most problems, most other colors of standard tattoo ink are also derived from heavy metals (including lead, antimony, beryllium, chromium, cobalt nickel and arsenic) and can cause skin reactions in some people.

Helen Suh MacIntosh, a professor in environmental health at Harvard University and a columnist for the website, Treehugger, reports that as a result of a 2007 lawsuit brought by the American Environmental Safety Institute (AESI), two of the leading tattoo ink manufacturers must now place warning labels on their product containers, catalogs and websites explaining that “inks contain many heavy metals, including lead, arsenic and others” and that the ingredients have been linked to cancer and birth defects.

Of course, exposure to mercury and other heavy metals is hardly the only risk involved with getting a tattoo. The term tattoo itself means to puncture the skin. Tattoo ink is placed via needles into the dermis layer of the skin, where it remains permanently (although some colors will fade over time). Some people have reported sensitivity springing up even years after they first got their tattoo; also, medical MRIs can cause tattoos to burn or sting as the heavy metals in the ink are affected by the test’s magnetism.