Today in rock history; Clearwater's WKRL adopts an all-Zeppelin format, Beatles rejected by Decca, Roxy opens in London and more

Simon & Garfunkel's "Silence" goes No. 1, too.

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Today in rock history: on this date in 1977, The Roxy — a brand new nightclub dedicated to booking and featuring punk rock acts in London, England — had its grand opening. For its first night, the club featured brand new band The Clash as headliners. The band played two sets and the cover charge was roughly $2. The club became the premiere venue for the punk rock scene and hosted punk shows often throughout its existence.

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Today in rock history: on this date in 1990, WKRL, a radio station in Clearwater, Florida decided to adopt an all-Led Zeppelin format which would consist of nothing but the music of the legendary British hard rock band. The format change is kicked off with a non-stop, full 24 hour day consisting of the band’s signature song, “Stairway To Heaven” being played repeatedly for the entire day. The format change lasts for two weeks before the station goes to an all classic rock format. The station is now WXTB, 97.9 FM (aka 98 Rock).

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Today in rock history: on this date in 1962, two new bands auditioned for British record label, Decca Records, in hopes of landing a recording contract. The bands were The Tremeloes and The Beatles. The label signs The Tremeloes and rejects The Beatles, a decision they’d soon regret. The label’s reasoning for the decision was that they felt like “guitar groups were on the way out.”

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Today in rock history; Simon and Garfunkel's historic Central Park concert and more

Today in rock history: on this date in 1966, American folk pop singing duo Simon & Garfunkel scored its very first No. 1 hit single. “The Sounds of Silence,” although not a commercial success upon its initial release, started getting airplay in a few markets around the country and soon was added in wide rotation to pop radio playlists all around the States. The single became the duo’s first chart-topper and held the top spot to open 1966 for two weeks.

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